"Gel Blasters are banned in Western Australia"

"We come back from our meeting with the Minister for Police with bad news.

GEL BLASTERS WILL BE BANNED IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA IN THE VERY SHORT TERM (one months’ time or so).

We were aware of this possibility ever since last year. That is why we’ve taken on Gelsoft as the Club’s objectives: to lobby for the sport and help it grow.

The reason for Gel Blasters getting banned is because of WA Police operational concerns regarding their use in crime, the expended resources, such as the Tactical Response Group, responding to Gel Blaster incidents and the concern that “innocent” people with Gel Blasters will be shot by WA Police one day. All of the above concerns are valid and such incidents have happened in various countries around the world with ■■■■■■■ devices. These concerns are also shared at the Federal level where they are also considering the benefit of banning importation of Gel Blasters.

Gel Blasters are not being banned because the Club also has ■■■■■■■ as its objectives, as it has been suggested to us. On the contrary; the Club has been the only organisation lobbying for the sport and representing your interests.

We understand there will be an amnesty period to hand in your Gel Blasters to WA Police, however the details are not yet available.

There is however good news as well. The Minister advised us he is looking at a number of amendments to the Firearms Act and that we will be consulted and given the opportunity to present our cause. The Minister was unable to provide any timeframes though.

What can we all do about this?

  1. As Labor holds majority in both Houses of Parliament the amendment to the Weapons Regulations (where Gel Blasters will be classified as Prohibited Weapons) is highly unlikely to be able to be opposed. You may try to write to your MP, however we do not believe there will be much success.

  2. We will continue lobbying and preparing for when the consultation on the amendment of the Firearms Act comes. This is a critical moment when the entire community needs to come together. WE WILL NEED YOUR SUPPORT! You’ve had a taste of this great sport and now Government is taking it away from you without consultation. We discussed with the Minister the possibility of doing a similar arrangement as South Australia did when they restricted possession of Gel Blasters to licensed firearms owners, however this proposition was rejected for the time being.

Please follow our Facebook page and we will keep you updated and request your support as necessary." - Laurentiu Zamfirescu

https://www.facebook.com/WAAGBC/

Has the Queensland example of regulation been considered, and what was the response if any to that? As in sensible regulation based on safety and concerns, but otherwise they are legal toys and the industry is booming.

Or the model of anywhere else in the fucking free world where Air$oft is legal and it is considered absurd that we have had to go to gel blasters. Gel blasters are legal even in China. Our governments have gone further than many of the most authoritarian states in the world.

I hate our useless fucking politicians and their limp dicks.

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Oh I agree, but if the common sense approach can’t be achieved, the Queensland one was a good compromise for freedom for sensible people while making politicians and civil servants feel like they accomplished something.

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It was always just a matter of time before the WA government realised there was something Western Australians enjoyed doing that they hadn’t banned yet! :slightly_frowning_face:

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The way the whole thing is worded doesn’t make sense, it seems like due to “Possibilities” its been banned… They even had to go as far as saying “All of the above concerns are valid and such incidents have happened in various countries around the world” which would tell me they are essentially making rules due to stuff that has not yet happened.

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In saying that, let’s ban any sharp objects including tools, knives and any sport requiring a bat due to the “Possibility” it might be used in a crime.

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Let’s see how this plays out and not shoot the messenger. I have some concerns, such as a Minister setting a hard and fast ban date, but then saying he’d be open to consultation on amendments. What has been the consultation process and how long has it been occurring to date? It all sounds like they have reached their conclusions already and this is a token meeting and process to tick off a box saying they were being nice to the community, but really don’t care what anyone has to say.

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FFS this is the last thing I wanted to hear today
Now I gotta start looking for a new job and a new fucking hobby :expressionless:

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Just also want to mention, after personally speaking with the person who was attending the meeting with the police and ministers and being told months ago that it was being accepted by both parties to this happening, just feels like someone has pissed someone off. Not sure how hard they were pushing ■■■■■■■, but if its been a matter of not even establishing this community and allowing time for the nuances to be sorted then they may have just backflipped on the whole idea and canned it.

“heres an idea, let’s ban a growing, competitive sport that gets people active and out of the house. Oh no unemployment has risen because the stores selling said sporting equipment had to close. oh crime involving firearms hasn’t decreased, oh well nothing we can do about that” pretty much every politician/police seems to say.
They’ll ban toys but seemingly not the thing they (mostly) imitate, I’m all for penalizing those who do the wrong thing to the full degree, but why do the other 99.99% have to get fucked over.:rage:

The only thing smart said out of the QLD opposition during the “debate” of the gel blaster regulations was the Government and Minister for Police rather than deal with real crime were spending their time “picking low hanging fruit” instead. Very true.

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I literally have a bow hanging in my room that I could very easily do some bad things with, do I need a licence, no, do I need to lock it up, no, how many crimes do you see or hear involving bows, practically none (I’m sure there are but nothing recently that I’m aware), yet I will happily lock my blaster in a case, keep it out of sight when traveling to a field etc so some Karen doesn’t mistake my (quite) obvious gel blaster as a real steal.
I could go to Bunnings and get the materials to make a crossbow that could very easily take a life, so we should ban all hardware stores so this doesn’t happen, by these politicians logic, but 99.99999% of the population isn’t that mentally unstable… Well most of us here at least.

The regulations got rid of bad publicity for the Government - which is always more important than results. Got to be seen to address the concerns of the constituents

(This is a sarcastic response in case anyone doesn’t understand)

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I’m reading a lot online, I wouldn’t be so quick to accept this as gospel or even representative of anything about to happen. Doesn’t sound or look like this was any form of public consultation, no other groups or persons at this meeting, and the group at the forefront are shamelessly pushing for AS legalisation, hell the blurb on their social media is all AS and not a mention of gel blasting, that was just added to the name of the page.

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I couldn’t find anything online either? Nothing from wagov, police commissioner or publicity docs from underlings? Hmmm…

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All of the Gelball community needs to come together as one and protest this in the streets… it may not be the only option but you need to let the pollies know you’re not going to take this laying down. The only way to get to pollies to pay attention is to threaten their cushy jobs. Just my 2c
Hope it goes well for you all
Cheers

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Bad news Bobby boy :sob:, I actually genuinely feel bad for you @DocBob if they get banned as you will have lost a lot

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But we would have gained so much.
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Wouldn’t jump out just yet, this is one group (maybe even one person) having a meeting with the Minister. It’s hardly a public consultation or a concrete reflection of what is to occur.

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